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Sunday, November 23, 2014

Grandma Jeddah's How to Nurture, Manage and Discipline Your Muslim Child with Special Needs--Book Review By: Hamiidah Muhammad

How to Nurture, Manage and Discipline
Your Muslim Child with Special Needs
Written by Grandma Jeddah

Published as an e-book ( www.grandmajeddah.com)
Reviewed by Hamiidah Muhammad
Pre-published in Sisters Magazine

You know how it is when there’s a topic you’re not very knowledgeable about? You hear about it all around you and see it on the TV, but never actually focus on it because it isn’t a part of your life. One day, something happens and brings that topic centre stage into your life and you actually have to investigate it. That’s what happened to me when I was asked to review Grandma Jeddah’s book, How to Nurture, Manage and Discipline your Muslim Child with Special Needs. Probably because here in Nigeria, most children with special needs are usually hidden away or forced into mainstream schools where they are labelled as stubborn or worse. I have never really had experience, first hand, of being with such a child. Grandma Jeddah’s book has been like a bright light suddenly switched on for me to cast away the dark shadows and blurry lines that there were for me on the topic of children with special needs.

As I read this book, I did not feel that some wild haired, arrogant professor was lecturing me. Rather, I felt that someone was talking to me, teaching me, simplifying things for me and making sure I was actually learning something. I found the book easy to read and I actually took something away from it. I learnt appropriate terminology and it was a very educating read. Grandma Jeddah would make a wonderful lecturer on this topic and I would appreciate seeing her do some Youtube videos!

I love that this book is written by someone who has actually lived with a child with special needs. It makes her words true and believable. It’s not just someone who has carried out numerous experiments in a lab but goes home to her ‘cognitively-able’ children at the end of the day. She is honest about how tough it is to live with cognitively disabled children, but also gives hope, reassuring such parents consistently that it is doable. She doesn’t encourage them to build castles in the air about their children functioning age appropriately, but she doesn’t suggest in any way that they should give up because of their special needs. Grandma Jeddah’s voice in this book is honest, encouraging and comforting; it says “I’ve been there and I know exactly what you are going through.”

The book reminded me of how perfect and complete the religion of Islam is. Every aspect of our lives is catered for and no individual is left out, definitely not cognitively disabled children. Grandma Jeddah reminds us of the touching story of Julaybib t. Having read his story a number of times, I had never actually considered him as someone with cognitive disabilities. But re-reading his story in the context of this book made me appreciate his story more and I looked at him, the lady who married him and the Rasul r with new, tear-laden eyes. All through the book, quotes from the Qur’an and the Hadith are used to buttress the writer’s points. This truly warmed my heart. I am not aware of other books on this topic written by a Muslim writer, certainly not written so well by a Muslim writer - I was truly pleased. She reminds parents of cognitively disabled children that Allah I is aware of their situation and that with sabr and du’a, they can get through it.

The book is sprinkled with examples of situations that may occur with cognitively disabled children and how best to handle them. The interviews included towards the end of the book provide a window through which people like me can peek into the lives of parents of such children and the children themselves. It is a humbling read.
I cannot reiterate enough how the author made such a complex topic so easy to read about and how that ease made it possible for me to actually attain some viable skills for working with children with special needs. It was also an eye-opener to what some mothers, fathers and whole families go through every day. I doff my hat to such families. Allah I is All Aware and has promised to never give us more than we can bear. We must be patient, strong and prayerful and tie up our camel by arming ourselves with the resources and support to get through our individual challenges. Grandma Jeddah’s book is a good starting point for those who have or work with children with special needs.

Hamiidah is a daughter, sister, mother, teacher and friend. Most importantly, she is a slave of Allah I trying hard to earn His Pleasure.

Order Here  How to Nurture, Manage and Discipline Your Muslim Child with Special Needs 

http://shop.grandmajeddah.com/Nurture-Manage-and-Discipline-Your-Special-Needs-Child-e-book-135.htm

Friday, November 21, 2014

"Yes" Can be Best By Grandma Jeddah

"Yes" Can be Best
By
 Grandma Jeddah

No one likes to hear “no.” We all like to have our way and do as we wish. But of course life isn’t always that sweet. When possible, give your child an affirmative answer to her requests. Many times “No” is the easiest answer, not the best or only answer. Can I do my homework later?  If it’s a Friday and there’s no school tomorrow, why not let your child use a token from her star chart to excuse herself from homework for a day.

                There are times when “No” means “No”. No way around it. During these occasions try to soften the “No.” 

Suhaila:                Can Jamillah spend the night?

Mother:               Not tonight, maybe another night.

You avoided giving a hard “No.” You haven’t opened yourself up to a definite promise with a date or specific time for the future, but you let your daughter down easy. Hope is better than a hard “no” and who knows, maybe you’ll decide to let the friend spend the night on some other occasion.
If your child wants a special dessert after dinner, rather than “No” try “Yes.”

                “ When you finish your vegetables, I’ll make banana bread.”  If you are too tired to bake, you could fix something simpler such as a smoothie, popcorn or fruit salad.

The point here is that parents shouldn't be so quick to say “No” or discredit their child’s requests. Cooperating with your child in this way shows your child that you are not her adversary. You want to work with her to solve her issues--you're on her side. This is one way to make discipline easier for both you and your child.

This is an excerpt from Grandma Jeddah’s e-Book: Discipline without Disrespecting: Discover the Hidden Secrets of How to Effectively Discipline Your Muslim Child—And Keep Your Peace of Mind While at It.  To order her e-Book or receive her free newsletter, visit her at: http://shop.grandmajeddah.com/  or   http://www.grandmajeddah.com/subscribe-page.html




Sunday, November 16, 2014

[Family Life - Part 1] Tips on Building a Productive Muslim Household (From:Productive Muslim, By: Grandma Jeddah

[Family Life - Part 1] Tips on Building a Productive Muslim Household (From:Productive Muslim, By: Grandma Jeddah

http://productivemuslim.com/family-life-part-1-tips-on-building-a-productive-muslim-household/#utm_source=ProM-Website&utm_medium=ProM-Website&utm_campaign=Website-Interlinking



Grandma Jeddah is the mother of 11 children and 13 grandchildren. She has taught hundreds of students for over 30 years at an Islamic school in Los Angeles, California.She is the author of, Discipline without Disrespecting: Discover the Hidden Secrets of How to Effectively Discipline Your Muslim Child--And Keep Your Peace of Mind while at It.  Order her e-book or Subscribe to her free newsletter at --http://shop.grandmajeddah.com/  and  http://www.grandmajeddah.com/subscribe-page.html

Insightful Quotes from Newest e-Book PARENTS RETIRE, PARENTING DOES NOT

Insightful Quotes from Newest e-Book PARENTS RETIRE, PARENTING DOES NOT

1.The status of parents was elevated by Islam, owing to parental care, sacrifices, and concern for their children, as well as parental effort in the proper upbringing of their children.  But unfortunately, parents have become more focused on careers and friends than their families."

2."Harvard, Oxford, and Cambridge have failed to produce a civilization of conscientious citizens."

3."We have a generation of academically strong, but psychologically weak graduates."

4."Material prosperity in terms of high salary, huge apartments, lavish cars, and branded devices cannot provide a foundation for a happy family."

5. "Many parents are failing to identify their children's problems. Many do not even realize that their child is asking for emotional attention and is suffering in silence."

6. Children are among the most valuable assets of society, but if they are neglected they can turn into liabilities not just for their families but for the entire society as well.


Parenting is a full time, lifetime duty, that deserves priority - let's grab the reigns with gusto and guide our children into the new frontier as strong Muslims who are psychologically and emotionally sound, insha'Allah.

Purchase your new book here: http://shop.grandmajeddah.com/Parents-Retire-Parenting-Does-Not-143.htm


Grandma Jeddah is the mother of 11 children and 13 grandchildren. She has taught hundreds of students for over 30 years at an Islamic school in Los Angeles, California.She is the author of, Discipline without Disrespecting: Discover the Hidden Secrets of How to Effectively Discipline Your Muslim Child--And Keep Your Peace of Mind while at It.  Order her e-book or Subscribe to her free newsletter at --http://shop.grandmajeddah.com/  and  http://www.grandmajeddah.com/subscribe-page.html

Grandma Jeddah's Book Reveiw: Everyday Islam: an Easy and Peaceful Way of Life

Grandma Jeddah Reviews 
Shumaysa Amatul Hadi Faruqi's new Book

Grandma Jeddah's Book Reveiw: Everyday Islam: an Easy and Peaceful Way of Life 

Shumaysa Amatul Hadi Faruqi’s Everyday Islam: an Easy and Peaceful Way of Life
You’ve heard it said many times before: Islam is a way of life. Shumaysa Amatul Hadi Faruqi presents a fitting display of this phrase in her new book, Everyday Islam:  An Easy and Peaceful Way of Life.

Everyday Islam gives examples of how every act we perform in our daily lives from sun up to sundown can be done in accordance with the teachings of Quran and our Prophet Muhammad (saw). The book covers useful practices we should instill in our lives starting with getting up in the morning until it’s time to retire in the evening.  Sister Shumaysa reminds us of helpful du’a we should make throughout the day such as when entering the bathroom, leaving the home, and returning back to our dwellings.

The book is clear, precise and easy reading—nothing challenging, just a simple reminder of how to place Islam first in our lives throughout the day. Shumaysa uses an easy going and warm style throughout the book. You feel like a friend is guiding you with gentle and kind reassurance that the Islamic way is indeed the best way to live your life, and it can be done simply.

I especially like her sections on childrearing and marriage. She emphasizes the importance of spending quality time with your family. She explains how time with family not only strengthens the bond of love, but it makes for a healthier family in general.  Indeed, those closest to us deserve our love, caring and affection most. She reminds us that having a family is one of the greatest blessings one can have, as many in the world have lost theirs.

A reflective hadith she includes in the book says that the one who maintains the ties of kinship is the one who does so when his relatives cut off ties from him—an admirable practice to remember.
Regarding the importance of marriage, she emphasizes what many of us already know but need constant reminders of— in order to have a healthy society, we need healthy family units which foster strong values. This is the type of environment which will nurture our children to become the”torch bearers of Islamic ethics and ideology”, she explains.

Everyday Islam stresses the importance of instilling good habits and manners in our children while they are young.  As we know, habits formed during childhood are often the ones that remain with us into adulthood. Reading Shumaysa’s  book Everyday Islam and using it’s reminders of how  to make Islam a part of our daily lives is a helpful guide in our endeavor to impri an Islamic way of life in our children’s hearts.

Purchase it here: http://www.amazon.com/Everyday-Islam-Easy-Peaceful-Life/dp/1502830779 

Grandma Jeddah is the mother of 11 children and 13 grandchildren. She has taught hundreds of students for over 30 years at an Islamic school in Los Angeles, California.She is the author of, Discipline without Disrespecting: Discover the Hidden Secrets of How to Effectively Discipline Your Muslim Child--And Keep Your Peace of Mind while at It.  Order her e-book or Subscribe to her free newsletter at --http://shop.grandmajeddah.com/  and  http://www.grandmajeddah.com/subscribe-page.html


Wednesday, November 12, 2014

We Have a Winner!

We Have a Winner!

Congratulations and Mabruk to Brother Jalal L. He was the first to send in his answers to the Fun Contest. He wins a FREE copy of our newest e-Book Parents Retire, Parenting Does Not.
May Allah bless him and his family to benefit greatly from the e-book.

Grandma Jeddah is the mother of 11 children and 13 grandchildren. She has taught hundreds of students for over 30 years at an Islamic school in Los Angeles, California.She is the author of, Discipline without Disrespecting: Discover the Hidden Secrets of How to Effectively Discipline Your Muslim Child--And Keep Your Peace of Mind while at It.  Order her e-book or Subscribe to her free newsletter at --http://shop.grandmajeddah.com/  and  http://www.grandmajeddah.com/subscribe-page.html

Monday, November 10, 2014

FUN CONTEST - WIN NEW E-BOOK!

FUN CONTEST - WIN NEW E-BOOK!

Come Join the fun and win our latest e-Book Parents Retire Parenting Does Not.

The First Person who answers All three questions wins a FREE copy of
Parents Retire Parenting Does Not. Learn more about the e-book here

Questions:


  1. List 7 pieces of advice Luqman gave to his son.
  2. Relay the conversation that Prophet                                                                                           Nuh had with his son.
  3. Prophet Ibrahim asked Allah to make him and his offspring                                                 submissive to Allah.In what Surah and Ayat can this be found?
Submit your answers on the Contact page at Grandma Jeddah's House Website - 
Peaceful Muslim Families. Click here